Ok, you got the job.

Ok, you got the job.

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    • #5725
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      Robin Gochenour
      Participant

      Sorry, new to this whole idea if working in different states when working seasonal. Now what do you all do for tax time? Do you file taxes in every state you worked in for the year? Or can it all be combined?

    • #5743
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      Keith Larson
      Participant

      Most things about the old tax man are complicated. This one isn’t an one answer fits all, or even fits anyone every year. First, do you know your current state’s residency definition pertaining to taxes? Especially ending residency qualification? Most states, but not all, use a definition where you must set up an abode elsewhere before your residency ends. This means you may owe taxes to that state, even if you haven’t been there for a long time, but just haven’t set up another residence. The definition includes a phrase that there is an intent to live there even if there is no job.

      You might also need to file taxes for the state, or states, where you work. Some states do not have income taxes. That makes it somewhat easier. You also have to look at residency definitions of where you work, if it does have taxes. Some will consider you as a partial resident, some will consider you as a non-resident. Some states have all three categories of residency, so you need to look into those definitions.

      Some states have different definitions. Most notably any state that doesn’t have an income tax, Alaska…where residency actually means you get paid, but that’s a full calendar year. Idaho, I know limits the residency to 15 months of not being in the state, and not planning on returning.

      Many use a tax professional. Some wing it. (The story of Capone, however, makes me a bit leery of taking chances with the taxman.) I am no longer defined as a resident any place. And I mainly use non-resident forms, when I’m in states that have income taxes. (Most states consider me to be a resident of Alaska, but I do not fit Alaska’s own definition of residency)

      I’m not sure if that answer makes sense to most people. But I hope I helped a little.

    • #5744
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      Robin Gochenour
      Participant

      Great info Keith, Thank You…
      Like you, I don’t want to tangle with the tax man.

      Your suggestions are actually very helpful. Food for thought. And ideas on what direction to investigate further. Thanks again, Robin

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